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We could work here for years: Occupations
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31 to 60 of 3631
Jul 2nd 2006

"Dancing is a primal art form!"

Jul 3rd 2006

Mrs. Halpert Where are you going to law school at?

Jul 3rd 2006 edited

I am a Software Quality Analyst (testing) for web applications, mostly web services. So I look at XML all day and come here to decompress.

Jul 7th 2006

I write musicals.

J1: you serious? About writing musicals, I mean?

Jul 7th 2006

I work at Dairy Queen where I make ice cream for people at min. wage, but all my friends work ther so we have some fun :)

Jul 8th 2006

I start work at McDonalds on monday..Good thing it's the night shift so I won't have to do a whole lot. It's only until college starts...but I really don't want to do it.

Jul 9th 2006

Okay, something slightly off-topic, but something I have been thinking about lately, and am wondering if anyone else notices this.... Just follow me for a minute:
It seems to me when our parents and their parents graduated from high school or college, and got their first job (which of course was in the field they went to school for), they planned to be there until retirement. And companies wanted to keep their employees there until retirement.
But at least in my circle of friends, it seems that our generation (age 22-30ish) is lacking direction. We graduate college and move back in with our parents, working at Starbucks or the local video store. And when we do get a job, it may or may not have anything to do with what we went to school for, and even then, we aren't happy there, and continue switching jobs for awhile. There are so many different fields/jobs to choose from, but we are not happy with what we choose. And it seems like companies aren't about loyalty / long-term experience either. Many people in our parents generation who have been at their jobs for 20 years are getting laid off and replaced with college grads.
But I am just wondering, why are we so discontent with our jobs? Is it laziness? A culture of "get what you want, and get it now"? And is this good for us? Or should we just suck it up and work hard no matter if we like our jobs or not?

Jul 9th 2006

Good question, Stella (or "stella", if you prefer the lower-case). I think for a lot of twenty-somethings the dissatisfaction with their jobs comes from the feeling that there should be more to life than what their employment situations offers, and the disparity between what they see valued in popular culture (fame, wealth, extravagence), and what they actually live with (living paycheck by paycheck, with bills and payments and other things cutting into their time).

I know from my own experience that it's not often a case of "being lazy in your job" so much as taking one when the profession you aspire to isn't open to you. I want to write professionally, but to pay the bills and student loans to continue my education I have had to take on manual labor jobs at grocery stores. Many of my family members made their living in the grocery store business because (as my grandpa says) people will always need food. But I don't get any satisfaction out of, not like the satisfaction I get when my name is in print on some slightly well-known humor website or local "hip newsmagazine for twenty-somethings" or the even rarer sensation of getting paid for it. Basically, I was cursed with the desire to do something creative, primarily in comedy. And unfortunately for me, the jobs that I would be best at or have the most satisfaction doing...are nowhere to be found in my part of the country (or if they are, I haven't come across them. There's not a lot of demand for humor writers in South Carolina, for some reason). And I don't have the financial means yet to leave for the opportunities in big market cities like New York or Los Angeles. Dammit...

Sorry, anyway, the point is that a lot of people in my generation and slightly younger (I'm assuming you're talking mostly about twenty-somethings who are old enough to remember Reagan but too young to remember Carter) probably got influenced by the idea that "there's more to life than" whatever profession they ended up in, and the disconnect between what they perceive as desirable and the actual reality of what they can achieve is too much at times. I don't think it's laziness for the most part (I work hard when I'm on the clock), it's just that there's no passion for the professions that you have to do to pay the bills. It's the classic "dreams versus reality" arguement, but heightened by the fact that you can turn on the TV and see someone like Paris Hilton make the news simply for being rich while you yourself have just come off an eight-hour shift and have no such accolades for your admittedly more important contributions to the society at large. Because let's face it, how has Paris H. contributed to the betterment of mankind? Not at all, and yet she gets the acclaim for who she is, not what (or who) she does

Sorry, that last line was a cheap shot, but you get my drift I hope.

Jul 9th 2006

stella said,

But at least in my circle of friends, it seems that our generation (age 22-30ish) is lacking direction. We graduate college and move back in with our parents, working at Starbucks or the local video store. And when we do get a job, it may or may not have anything to do with what we went to school for, and even then, we aren't happy there, and continue switching jobs for awhile. There are so many different fields/jobs to choose from, but we are not happy with what we choose.

stella after I read your very perceptive comment, I couldn't help but look to see what your occupation is. Being a preschool teacher is one of the most rewarding careers out there. Don't ever let anyone convince you otherwise. Many people think that all we do is play with kids all day. They don't realize the hard work and sacrifices that go into developing a positive and challenging learning environment. The rewards of working with children are both immediate and long-term. They are immediate, as in bringing a smile to a tear-stained face, and long-term to the extent that we are making a difference in the lives of children as well as providing positive early learning experiences for the children that we work with. The job of an early childhood teacher is both exciting and challenging. I see myself as a mentor, facilitating the natural sense of wonder for tomorrow’s leaders.

Many young preschoolers today spend the majority of their day away from home. Away from the loving, nurturing environment of family. No one, not even the best child care provider will be able to love a child the way their natural parents can. One of the best things we can do as a preschool teacher and caregiver, is help our children to know that they have value and importance to others. We want to give them the best possible start. We have been entrusted with this wonderful privilege. Don't ever take the value of your work for granted. You are to be highly esteemed.

Jul 9th 2006

I absolutely agree and can relate to everything said about "our generation's" propensity to switch jobs. Every one of my friends, all college graduates, have switched jobs at least twice since graduation. Most of them working in areas not in their field of study. I was an English major and wanted to become a writer. Life and responsibilities got in the way, a.k.a. student loans. So, I went full time at my part time grocery store job to pay the bills. I advanced to management pretty quickly but I hated every minute. I would also like to add that my parents were none to pleased that after 4 years of college, I worked at a grocery store. It really was a hard job. I stuck with it for 5+ years before quitting.

My next job was working as a marketing representative for a medical diagnostic center. Obviously not within the realm of my major either. I was the only college graduate out of 15 marketing reps. I quit after I had my daughter.

So, now I am a stay at home mom. In fact, all of my married college friends stay home with their kids. So, none of us are using our precious degrees but we are still paying for them! My mother loves to bring up this fact at least once a month. Did I mention I am 30?

Jul 9th 2006

PurseGirl said,

So, now I am a stay at home mom. In fact, all of my married college friends stay home with their kids. So, none of us are using our precious degrees but we are still paying for them! My mother loves to bring up this fact at least once a month. Did I mention I am 30?

PurseGirl, When your mother mentions that you are wasting your"precious" degree, remind her that your child is the most precious possession you will ever have and hold, and the time you spend with your child now is more important than any secular career. There will always be time for you to pursue your career goals once your children are in school most of the day, but you will never be able to make up for the time lost with your children while they are young. There is a saying that goes,

100 years from now……it will not matter what your bank account was, the sort of house you lived in, or the kind of car you drove.…But the world may be different because you were important in the life of a CHILD

You and your college friends are to be commended for not yielding to the pressures all around you. You have made the best choice.

Jul 10th 2006

My wife left a pretty good paying job to stay home with our daughter. Money is tight now, and sometimes my wife feels bad that she no longer "contributes" to the family...but I tell her that you can always make money later, but you can never get back these moments with our daughter.

Jul 10th 2006 edited

Plaid- It's a double edged sword. My mom loves the fact that I can stay home and raise my daughter but at the same time I know she wishes I had done "something" with my college education. Catch 22? :) Thanks for the comments! What a wonderful quote!

Jinx- you are very supportive of your wife! Sometimes I feel like your wife does but my husband is like you. He wants us to raise our child ( at home) as long as we can afford it. It's totally worth it.

Jul 10th 2006 edited

College Student at a state University No job
Hopefully I can get a work study job next term, but I'm pretty picky about the jobs I would do. I really want to read books onto tape again for disabilities services. I worked for disabilities services at the community college I attended, and the most interesting thing I got to do was go to a Yoga class with a blind student and explain to her the positions she was supposed to perform. I was not allowed to touch her, so it was pretty challenging. But I was able to do the yoga along with her. Getting paid to do yoga was awesome.

Jul 12th 2006

I'm a professional woman...a CPA. Not head of accounting, but am an auditor in a big 4 accounting firm, so it's equally as respected as the head of accounting. Having graduated college 4 years ago, most of my coworkers were not able to find a job in the field that they studied, so they have a short-term job before returning to graduated/law/med school.

Jul 12th 2006 edited

My Jobs:

  • Cashier at a large grocery store in small-town America. Really cool to see all walks of life come through my aisle.

  • Medical Records intern for a cardiologist. Got to shadow the doctor once a week, watched heart surgery, right next to the patient. Bloody fun.

  • Porno handler. Let me explain: I worked for my university's film department. The chair professor was a lesbian feminist activist. And, much to the chagrin of the overwhelmingly heterosexual student body, all the film classes were angled in a "Queer/Feminist" theory angle. So I had to prepare the readings for these classes, many of which were "illustrated," to say the least. Being a straight male, it certainly was no chore organizing and cataloging scores of lesbian porn. "Inside Ginger Lynn" was one of the class viewing materials. Why did I leave that job??

  • Medical Records intern for an oncologist. Get to follow the doctors around at times as well. Also a lot of fun. [Current job for the summer.]

  • [Full Time Job during the school year] College student, studing Mathematics and English. They are boring.

  • Eventually: corporate lawyer, investment banker, or (ideally) hedge fund manager or venture capitalist.

    My ideal job would be VC on MWF, a high school English teacher on T/TH, and coach high school basketball every evening. Both my medical-related jobs had large office components to them, and my current one looks a lot like Dunder Mifflin - Scranton, in terms of color scheme and such.

Jul 12th 2006 edited

Great Scott, all I can say is, GREAT SCOTT!

Jinx said,

sometimes my wife feels bad that she no longer "contributes" to the family

Here is a quote from my earlier post.

Many young preschoolers today spend the majority of their day away from home. Away from the loving, nurturing environment of family. No one, not even the best child care provider will be able to love a child the way their natural parents can.

Jinx, Help your wife realize that she is contributing to the family in the best way possible. Both of you have made a decision not to give the responsibility of raising your child to someone else. The fact that you put the word "contribute" into quotes tells me that you already know that financial input is not the only way to contribute to your family. But, while we are on the subject of financial input…

Jinx and PurseGirl, If you haven’t already done this it’s a good idea to do this now. Sit down and calculate the cost of working and you may find that you are not missing that much financially to stay at home with your child.

Consider the costs of:

  1. Additional car expenses for commuting to and from work. “Gas ain’t free.”(Dwight)

  2. Parking, tolls, wear and tear on car.

  3. Meals eaten out.

  4. The big one – Childcare.

  5. Professional work clothes and dry cleaning expenses.

  6. Additional income taxes. You are heavily penalized for having two incomes.

  7. Household help.

You may or may not incur all of these expenses in order to work. For some people there are even more expenses like the cost of a new car. I’m sure that by looking at the true cost of working, you will find that it really isn’t costing you all that much financially to stay at home.

The true cost of working is that someone else will be raising your child. Someone else will be there for the milestones; the first time your child sits up, rolls over, laughs, takes his first step, utters his first words. Don’t allow anyone to rob you of the opportunity to be a stay-at-home parent.

Jul 12th 2006 edited

Plaid,

We did itemize work expenses before our daughter was born and realized one income would be fine. Add in childcare and the decision was easy for one of us (me) to stay home. It works and it's worth it!

Jul 13th 2006

First: I'm a court reporter or stenographer, whichever you prefer

Second: I could go pages and pages about the topic stella brought up touching on not only my own situation, but also my husband's as well as my 15 year-old step-daughter. Thankfully, I won't.

I did, though, just want to make two quick comments specifically off-topic:

Jinx - what a wonderful and, more importantly, accuarate thing for you to say to your wife. Say that to her often, won't you? My husband was the stay-at-home parent for the first three years of our child's life before she began going to preschool and I was always a mixture of immense grattitude and jealousy (but mostly the first one)

stella - on the side note of your occupation, I must tell you, I am greatful every day for the people who took care of and taught my child in pre-school. I feel that her time there was invaluable and paved the way for her to acheive great success in her future education - and by "success" I mean both through knowledge and happiness. Be proud you are part of a group of people involved in a very important step in a child's growth and development.

Jul 13th 2006

Wow, folks, I really appreciate the job-related encouragement. That's nice to hear. I agree that it is an important role (those First 5 and all), however, I am still having trouble getting past the putting in 8-10 hours per week of "prep time" for which I am not paid, as well as the small budget for supplies, etc. And I know that's something all teachers (at least good ones) have to do. But somedays I just feel like all the effort and work are not worth my little paycheck. I think I just have to realize that if I love it, I have to sacrifice time/money for having a job I enjoy.
It is interesting to hear thoughts on the "our generation's job dissatisfaction" issue, for some reason that is really interesting to me. It seems like right now, most of my friends (ages anywhere from 18-32) are in a state of job crisis (as in should I stay, go, or what do I want to be when I grow up???). I thought it was interesting Two-Hole Punch Jim, that you are wanting a creative job, but struggling through unpleasant ones in the meantime. I think when our generation was young, our parents/teachers stressed creativity on us, and now we all want to be artists/musicians/writers/actors/filmmakers, etc, but it is dang difficult to make money through creative endeavors.
One reason that I think we change jobs so frequently (compared to our parents/grandparents) is that we have so many more options, and can hear about them. We only have to hop on monster.com and find all kinds of jobs that our better than our current one, or that pay more but we are not quite qualified for, etc. It can promote a lot of dissatisfation (or hope!). I think someday I will do mass research and write a book about our generation of job-seekers. That's all for now.

Jul 13th 2006

Stella said,

I am still having trouble getting past the putting in 8-10 hours per week of "prep time" for which I am not paid, as well as the small budget for supplies, etc. And I know that's something all teachers (at least good ones) have to do. But somedays I just feel like all the effort and work are not worth my little paycheck.

That is so true. The field of Child Development has lost so many really wonderful teachers that have been forced to leave their position out of necessity, for a job that was less rewarding, but paid better. The highest quality programs are the ones with a high employee retention rate. It is no mystery that stabliity is important for children, but the high turnover of teachers is the reality. It is a difficult issue with no easy solution. The parents are already paying high costs for child care, and the schools/centers aren't reaping great profits either.

Jul 13th 2006 edited

Wow there are some very hefty discussions here, of which I have not yethad enough experience to make any sort of contribution. I'm still an university student. I'm in a 6 years Pharmacy Program at Rutgers U. in NJ. After this summer, I'm going on to my 5th year, so I guess there's no turning back... I'm also a part time Walgreens Pharmacy technician :)

I can't think of any perceptive opinions about our generation right now. Right now, it's more like it was kind of hard seeing a lot of my friends graduating this year and getting a real job. But hey I'm almost there. Then I'll be the pharmacist that's everyone's best friend! Or at least garbagethrowers's BFF :)

ps. Rogaine is not a prescription drug. Vaccines for spontaneous hydroplosion and hot dog fingers are currently under clinical trials, stay tuned.

Jul 14th 2006

Vaccines for spontaneous hydroplosion and hot dog fingers are currently under clinical trials, stay tuned.

Ha! Nice. And your name is funny in a Kevin-ish sort of way.

Jul 15th 2006 edited

I am an escort. Last "real" job I had was as a Technical Publications Coordinator for an aeronautical engineering firm. I enjoy my current position a lot more.

Jul 16th 2006

I am going to be a senior in high school.

Jul 16th 2006

I am a receptionist.

Believe it or not I have to answer the phone and answer it in the same manner as Pam and I hate my job as much as she does.."It's not many little girls dream to be a receptionist" Plus there is no Jim to make my day more enjoyable.

I am planning to return to school in the fall and get out of there as soon as possible.

Jul 16th 2006

I am actually a middle schooler. The Office is quite popular at our school. Especially Dwight

Jul 16th 2006 edited

I am actually a middle schooler

Peach Iced Tea:
Funny; I think I asked you if you had gone to my college in another thread.
I guess not.

You type beyond your years.

Jul 17th 2006

But I am just wondering, why are we so discontent with our jobs? Is it laziness? A culture of "get what you want, and get it now"? And is this good for us? Or should we just suck it up and work hard no matter if we like our jobs or not?

It's so ironic that this topic has been raised right now, as we've been in NJ visiting my in-laws. Both of them are dilligent, nose-to-the-grindstone workers. My FIL just retired and my MIL is getting ready to retire next spring; even so, she's still dedicated to her job and takes her responsibilities seriously.

One time a couple years ago when I was unhappy with my job (at an office), my MIL, trying to be helpful, told me that when I got a little older, I'd probably look back on it as being a really good job; I think her exact words were "as good as it gets." Her words struck me as being so bleak and unpromising that I literally started crying (quietly, of course) over the phone. I hated the work I was doing (admin at an insurance agency), there was no room for advancement, and I felt like I was spinning my wheels. My boss told me this: "Work is work. If work was fun, then they'd call it something else." I was working in a job that offered basically a paycheck only, and to hear someone describe it as "one of the best jobs you'll ever have" was a little too much to handle. I guess my basic philosophy was (and is) that if I'm going to spend 40+ hours a week doing something, why not try to have fun as well as earn money? What's wrong with doing both? That's when I went back to school and got my teaching degree. I loved teaching (it had its own set of difficulties, but none like the ones I faced working in an office).

The generational question is a really good one. I've thought about it a lot and have no answer. That kind of work ethic is so admirable. On the other hand, I hate the idea of not striving for something more just because you have the idea that you need to be responsible and settle for what's in front of you.

Jul 17th 2006

Thanks for all of your support for stay at home parents, Plaid. I couldn't agree more with everything you wrote. There are plenty of days when I'm unshowered and stressed and would rather be working (even in an office) than be at home with my kids. But I know I'm doing the right thing. My 3-year-old son (who was described by the pediatrician as being "difficult to parent") is especially frustrating, but when I get to the end of my rope with him, I think, "But if I'm his mom and I get this frustrated with him, what would it be like for a frazzled, underpaid daycare worker who doesn't love him like I do? What kind of care would he get from her?" Then I remember why I'm home right now. I am convinced that no one can do a better job of raising him than I can (well, my husband probably could...but don't tell him that ;-) We're pretty broke since I stopped teaching, but at the end of the day, I am Joseph's and Kate's mom. And that thought makes me happy...right before I fall into an exhausted sleep.

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