Not signed in (Sign In)
Welcome to The Watercooler, the companion forum to Northern Attack and all things concerning The Office on NBC.

Guests are free to browse the forums, although you will need to register for an account if you wish to participate in the discussions or use any of the advanced features of the forum (bookmarks, history, etc).

If you already have an account, please sign in now.

The Watercooler is powered by Vanilla, the sweetest forum on the web.

Bottom of Page
Good vocabularies run amuck: What are your favorite words?
  1. <
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 37
  5. 38
  6. 39
  7. 40
  8. 41
  9. 42
  10. 43
  11. 44
  12. >
1201 to 1230 of 1301
Mar 27th 2012

"...Nazareth"?

And, circle gets the square.

Mar 27th 2012

Yep...catch-22.

Mar 27th 2012

Apoplectic. I like that word. Also, ostensibly. Yerp. Like that one too.

Mar 28th 2012

Abbatoir.

Apr 3rd 2012

Hasta.

Equidistant.

Apr 11th 2012

Conniption.

Apr 11th 2012

Oh, I love that word!

Apr 11th 2012

Tousled.

Apr 11th 2012

I always think of sex when I hear the word "tousled."

Apr 11th 2012

Me too.

Who am I kidding...I think of sex whenever I hear any word.

Apr 11th 2012

You need a word to remind you?

Apr 11th 2012

Is it "foliage"?

Apr 11th 2012

Probably "moms" is the word that works the best.

Apr 17th 2012

I'm curious about a word history, and DftF might know, since he's smart about words. Well, he's generally smart, but also knows about words. Other smart people might know, too.

Why does "lovely" mean "attractive" or "beautiful"? Why does it describe something physical, rather than have a meaning that's something more to do with "love"?

Apr 18th 2012

Well, people have been using that word, or one very like it, for seven hundred years or so, with pretty much the same meaning. Originally it meant "lovable"; at a certain point it transmuted into "having properties that make something lovable" (ie, beautiful, or wonderful), though no one really could tell you precisely why -- language works like that a lot: it just kind of drifts.

There are some obvious examples of linguistic drift that are kind of similar but more current. For instance, the word "hopefully" has come to mean "one hopes" rather than (or maybe in addition to) "full of hope". Here:

Hopefully, the Mets will find some pitching and not lose 100 games this year.

vs.

The Mets hopefully put Santana on the mound on Opening Day.

Until not that long ago, the former usage would have been incorrect: "hopefully" meant only "full of hope". The language has drifted, though.

Anyway, this is probably what happened with "lovely", which was originally a noun that was adjectivized ("love" - "lovely") to mean "affectionate or lovable". What's remarkable is how consistent its meaning has been for the last 700 years.

(Also, in 1300, the word would have been spelled luflic -- inasmuch as there was a standard spelling --, but said largely the same way.)

Apr 18th 2012

That's really interesting, D=tF. You should come here and teach us about stuff more often.

Apr 18th 2012

I knew you'd know. Thank you!

I was out and about this weekend and the scenery was gorgeous and I said, "It's so lovely." Then I thought, "That doesn't make any sense. Why do people say that?"

Apr 18th 2012

I like how there are "rules" which each language seems to follow as it drifts. For instance, (I'm going to just make something up), in English the U sound becomes more like an O sound in certain words, but in German the U sound becomes more like an E. This is why certain words are similar ("one" and "ein"), yet a little different. By tracing the vowel and consonant shifts, they can determine what the word sounded like in the root language (something more like "Un"). And of course the root Anglo-Germanic language split from the Spanish at an even earlier time, and they say it like "Uno".

A word like "one" is a good one to trace, because it's universal, and not likely to change.

Someone traced back all the European languages (using words that would be universal, like "head" or "moon"), and formulated what the original proto-Indo_European language would have sounded like 10,000 years ago.

Apr 18th 2012

Hopefully, the Mets will find some pitching and not lose 100 games this year.

That would be lovely.

Apr 18th 2012

A word like "one" is a good one to trace, because it's universal, and not likely to change.

What if you pick up a second thing? Then it becomes "two."

Apr 18th 2012

Clearly, Jinx didn't think that through. He should have used a better word, like boobs.

Apr 18th 2012

They always come in twos.

Apr 18th 2012

Too true.

Just got this in my email. I subscribe to the online AP Stylebook, so they let you know when they change a style rule or make up a new one. Timely.

An updated entry has been added to AP Stylebook Online.

hopefully

The traditional meaning is in a hopeful manner. Also acceptable is the modern usage: it's hoped, we hope.
Correct: "You're leaving soon?" she asked hopefully.
Correct: Hopefully, we'll be home before dark.

In other words, until today it was incorrect to use the modern usage in a newspaper or on a newspaper website.

Apr 18th 2012

Clearly, AP Storybook Online reads our forum.

Apr 19th 2012

Hopefully they get all our jokes.

Apr 19th 2012

Conglomerate.

May 23rd 2012

When you try to call your brother out for being condescending, remember "condensation" is the not the right word to use:

I could hear the condensation in your voice.

He'll feel right.

Aug 8th 2012

Lying here in wakefulness at night, or at least before daylight...I remember a question I had the other day.

DftF, I'm sure you'll know the answer. What is the/Is there a connection between the word "matrimony" and "matricide"? Or, rather, are the roots of "matrimony" and "matricide" the same?

The meanings are very different, so why are they similar words? Or is it a coincidence?

Aug 8th 2012

"mater" is probably latin for "mother", "cide" means murder (homocide, suicide), and I'm guessing "mony" is the same word that's found in "ceremony".

"Mater", "mother", "mutter", are all different European ways of saying "mother", and are obviously from the same root language.

  1. <
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 37
  5. 38
  6. 39
  7. 40
  8. 41
  9. 42
  10. 43
  11. 44
  12. >
1201 to 1230 of 1301
Top of PageBack to discussions