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Good vocabularies run amuck: What are your favorite words?
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Feb 8th 2007

That's more than OK. It's encouraged.

I say yikes a lot.

Feb 8th 2007 edited

I like these: abscond, superfluous and pandemonium

Feb 8th 2007

bulbous bouffant. (10 geek points if you get the reference)

Feb 8th 2007

banal

Feb 8th 2007

I used flabbergasted in a post recently, that was enjoyable.

Feb 8th 2007

My economics teacher used pooey today in class. And a word I like, and may have made up, is linky. Like if someone is tall and lanky, and built similarly to our former President and fellow Northern Attacker, Abraham Lincoln.

Feb 8th 2007 edited

I'm gonna butcher the spelling here but it's from that commercial with the turtles, "Pahoihoi."

And "footy pajamas"...more of a phrase though

Feb 8th 2007

save da receptionist

Regarding ampersand... There used to be 27 letters in the alphabet. The symbol & was considered a letter and fell after Z. When children recited the alphabet, it went "X, Y, Z, & per se and." ("and which means and") Over time, it got more and more slurred until it became ampersand. Later, the powers that be decided that & was actually a symbol, not a letter, so it was dropped from the end.

I am not kidding.

Feb 8th 2007

I should have studied for the GRE with this thread

Feb 8th 2007

As for my own favorite words...

  • shenanigans: I wrote an entire paragraph in a paper during college solely to use this word. It was a dare.

  • queue: Fun to write. Even more fun to watch other people attempt to write.

  • exuberant: No real reason. I just like it.

Also, I hate hate hate the word proctor. It gives me the shivers just to write it.

Feb 8th 2007

Radicchio (inspired by today's lunch)

Feb 8th 2007

My son will sometimes (often, really) say, "Mom, that's a funny word." And he'll say it again and again and really think about it and giggle. I'm not sure of the criteria, but they really are the kind of words that sound funny when you repeat them (just like any word, if you do it enough). Today's funny words have been:

  • windshield
  • Michelle
  • misty
Feb 8th 2007 edited

Hey, Ampersand is my techno music alter ego. I'm obscure and everything!

slobber
screed

Feb 8th 2007

My son will sometimes (often, really) say, "Mom, that's a funny word." And he'll say it again and again and really think about it and giggle. I'm not sure of the criteria, but they really are the kind of words that sound funny when you repeat them (just like any word, if you do it enough).

Something like that happens to me a lot, too; a quite ordinary word sometimes suddenly strikes me as strange-sounding. For example:

three
next
jump

Feb 8th 2007

Also, mêlée. So many fun little accents.

Feb 8th 2007

a quite ordinary word sometimes suddenly strikes me as strange-sounding.

It's true. Try it with spaghetti and aluminum, too. My sixth-grade science teacher pointed these out. He was an "exchange teacher" from Australia, and the way Americans speak amused him to no end. Mixed Berries, is that true? Do American accents crack you up? I think British and Australian accents are often sexy. I've been watching "The Wiggles" too often, I think.

I've said too much.

Feb 8th 2007

Speaking of The Wiggles, I love the way they say squirrel and balloon. It sounds like squee-ral and bil-yoon.

Feb 8th 2007

Susudio the Phil Collins song. Probably spelled it wrong. Still don't know what it means or if it is a person's name. Anyone care to clarify? Still a very fun word to say. Su-su-sudio!

Feb 8th 2007 edited

I think British and Australian accents are often sexy.

I agree, LT, but not only sexy (that really depends on the speaker) but accents are just interesting to listen to. I will watch Hugh Laurie on anything just to hear his normal British self. Why is it so fascinating? And I've thought before that a small reason I love the BBC office and Extras is the speech. Attraction of the foreign, I guess. But I agree, British and Australian accents are the most appealing.

Feb 8th 2007

Pompitous from Steve Miller's The Joker. "I speak of the pompitous of love..." Am I the only one who thinks that is what he said? Have I got it totally wrong?

Feb 8th 2007

For Long Tim

Macadamia!

Gazebo!

Spatula! Influenza!!!!

(Bus.)

Feb 8th 2007

but not only sexy (that really depends on the speaker) but accents are just interesting to listen to. I will watch Hugh Laurie on anything just to hear his normal British self.

That's definitely a better explanation. And I feel the same way about Hugh Laurie. I watched his Letterman video on YouTube the other day, and I just sat at the computer, slack-jawed. He could have been talking about shoveling dog poop and I still would have listened. Has he ever narrated an audiobook? I'd listen, no matter the topic.

Feb 8th 2007

I love the word "flibbertigibbit."

Feb 8th 2007

good one Pan.

these two...

Spatula! Influenza!!!!

made me think of flatulence

But I really came here to post: cocktail

I mean, really let that one sink in a moment. Who put those two words together and called it a drink? I'm guessing they were once elaborately decorated, perhaps with feathers, to resemble a chicken's butt. But still, you wouldn't meet up with friends after work at Chili's for PenisHineys, would you?

Feb 8th 2007

Pan, heard that word on Oprah last week. A woman used the gibbit part of the word to name a Croc shoe decoration product.

Feb 8th 2007

I fell in love with it in the movie "Joe vs. the Volcano."

Feb 8th 2007

OK... I might have to take ignorant issue with that ampersand definition, at least in part (ignorant issue means I'm not looking up the origins of that story but going with my own observations). Have you ever seen a really fancy, old-to-middle English style font for the Latin "et" (which means "and," I presume)? It basically makes an ampersand, where the middle bar on the E crosses the T, which loops to the right at the bottom. I've seen it in many, many contexts, and will look around online to see if there's a graphic, but that's where the symbol came from. I'm positive. And prepared to be lined up against the proverbial wall for cockiness.

Feb 8th 2007

God, I'm Good

Yes, I did put this theory all together myself. At least for how it looks...

Feb 8th 2007

Hey look! Everybody's right!

Feb 8th 2007 edited

But still, you wouldn't meet up with friends after work at Chili's for PenisHineys, would you?

Um, who's buying and is there a little umbrella? Sure, I might partake in a PenisHiney. Or a frozen BananaBadonkadonk.

edited to add "frozen"- sounds rather refreshing, actually

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