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Good vocabularies run amuck: What are your favorite words?
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Feb 8th 2007 edited

Wow. You are good, KarenM. And 2C2C will be totally impressed by your use of Wikipedia to find information and prove obscure theories, too.

Feb 8th 2007 edited

I am indeed. (Who says "indeed"?)

Feb 8th 2007

Me.

And Dr. Smith from the old Lost in Space series.

Feb 8th 2007

I was able to use a dieresis the other day on a psychology test. I barely wrote it, though because I wasn't sure it belonged there. The word was "coördination." Tell me I was right, GrammarGurus.

Feb 8th 2007

Divergence: one of my favorite words, and what I'm going to take right now.

Someone was saying they wrote a whole paper in college so as to use the word "shennanigans."

That reminded me of the dares my friends would extend during exams. I had to work the terms "A certain je ne sais quoi," "If I may be so bold," and "space janitor" into a geology exam.

(The exam yielding another favorite word: detritus.)

Also, one said he'd pay another friend $20 if she named her English paper "She's Still a Ho: Helen of Troy throughout the Ages." She did, and she got a B+.

We certainly did have nerdy fun in college!

Feb 8th 2007

YES! Ok, maybe I was a little too happy there. yes!

Feb 8th 2007 edited

Also, one said he'd pay another friend $20 if she named her English paper "She's Still a Ho: Helen of Troy throughout the Ages." She did, and she got a B+.

I don't think teachers care about stuff like that as much as we think they do. On that same psychology test, I couldn't remember the function of the reticular formation. So I wrote "shaped like a fish. it doesn't do anything. just a useless fish-shape." I still got an A.

Strangely, the pictures on wikipedia look nothing like the fish shape on my test. Huh.

Feb 8th 2007

That was me, Pan.

The dare was to use it in the paper, which, by the way, was for the hardest professor in the department. She made me cry. More than once.

Anyway, I had to write a whole paragraph in order to fit the word in. The paper was a movie analysis. Funny--a few years later, that paper was incorporated into my senior thesis, shenanigans and all.

Feb 8th 2007

Word from history class today: clandestine.

Feb 8th 2007

algedonic--it perfectly describes my feelings as related to the saga of JAM.

Feb 8th 2007

2C2C, I like your fish shape story. Yay higher ed!

I also agree about students thinking that teachers care more than they actually do about things like titles. As long as you know what's going on, a good laugh is completely acceptable. (You should have seen some of my paper titles. They make Helen of Troy look tame in comparison. Nobody paid me $20 for any of them, but I finished at the top of my class.)

Feb 8th 2007

ballyhoo
donnybrook
tomfoolery

Feb 8th 2007

flaccid

Feb 8th 2007

Or, on the other hand, tumescent.

Feb 8th 2007

flaccid

I can't ever use this adjective because of the noun that I associate with it.

Feb 8th 2007 edited

sepulchre
triskaidekaphobia
nuptial
acetaminophen
aglet

Feb 8th 2007

liniment

Feb 8th 2007

flaccid

I can't ever use this adjective because of the noun that I associate with it.

Same here.

Feb 8th 2007

there was much discussion of liniment, I think on the haiku thread. Where are ya ferd?

Feb 8th 2007 edited

colloquium
(Catherine ZJ used it on her Pretzel Day thread and I loved it immediately, even if that is just an actual term for an ordinary event and not a fancy or poetic term for an exotic event!)

2C2C will be totally impressed by your use of Wikipedia to find information and prove obscure theories, too.

Along with my role as office instigator, I was the Internet looker-upper. We'd get onto some topic at lunch, come up with what was probably a rhetorical question, and I'd find the answer when we got back. Pudenda was one of those topics (as in no one believed me when I used it), as was the weight of the average breast implant.

Sadly, when I think flaccid it's usually in the context of my stalky houseplants. I don't give them enough water, because the bulk of them are on a floor by themselves with no faucets and I hate carrying water up and down stairs.

Feb 8th 2007

synchronicity

Feb 8th 2007

I can't ever use this adjective because of the noun that I associate with it.

I debated posting it but it's such a funny sounding word I decided to go ahead. Thanks KarenM for coming up with another use.

Feb 9th 2007

pseudo-intellectual. Pseudo-anything, really, but definitely that one.

Feb 9th 2007

Spork - see Question: thread.

and Ipso Facto is just fun to say.

I love this thread :)

Feb 9th 2007

Nathan, Brian was right. I do like your word. :)

Feb 9th 2007

tubular!

Feb 9th 2007

Asphyxiation. Although a nasty thing, it's a cool word.

Feb 9th 2007

I just watched Chocolat with my friends for the umpteenth time, so I have a few more to add to the list.

Decadent
Chocolaterie (said with a very thick French accent)
and Johnny Depp

Feb 10th 2007

I've taken quite a few road trips to So. Cal and Las Vegas. There is an exit off of Highway 15 with an unusual name. It is claimed to be the last word in the English dictionary. I've turned off the exit before just because I wanted to see what was there. There's nothing noteworthy there except for the name of the exit.

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