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Good vocabularies run amuck: What are your favorite words?
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Feb 11th 2007 edited

artesian, the best kind of well

I've taken quite a few road trips to So. Cal and Las Vegas. There is an exit off of Highway 15 with an unusual name. It is claimed to be the last word in the English dictionary. I've turned off the exit before just because I wanted to see what was there. There's nothing noteworthy there except for the name of the exit.

So I'm reading my Entertainment Weekly and I finish the feature on Rashida Jones - much lovery for her now - and I turn the page. And what stares me in the face but an article with the headline "The Movie That Grossed $30.00," a 2006 thriller starring Tom Sizemore and Grey's Anatomy's Katherine Heigl.

Guess the movie's name, TO101

Feb 12th 2007

Asphyxiation

if you never knew the meaning, it's fun to say!

Feb 12th 2007

Guess the movie's name, TO101

You're kidding. Just remember you heard it from me first. I've gotta go make some phone calls to my road trip buddies.

Feb 14th 2007 edited

The other day when I told you guys about the brain fish shape, and linked to wikipedia's article on the reticular formation, and it didn't look like a fish, I was kind of embarrassed. So here's the picture that was on my study guide and test. Ladies and gentlemen, may I present to you, the reticular formation.

(It's K on the diagram.)

Feb 14th 2007

That DOES look like a fish! Kind of like an anchovy!

Feb 14th 2007 edited

Which reminds me of a joke I love, related only because I love the word "surrealist":

Q: How many surrealists does it take to screw in a lightbulb?
A: Fish.

Feb 14th 2007 edited

Flibbertigibbet -- an irresponsible person, a flighty person, or someone who tends to talk a lot without ever making a solid point.

Feb 14th 2007

I like pensive.

Feb 14th 2007

crevasse and cravat, but not crevice

Feb 14th 2007

I've always liked the way these words roll off the tongue: narcissist and narcissism, which were derived from the Greek god Narcissus.

Feb 16th 2007

eviscerated

Feb 16th 2007

Just wanted to lay down my claim for avuncular, unless someone's said it already.

I'm always trying to employ it in conversation. It's hard though, as not many things have the properties of being like an uncle.

Feb 16th 2007

barcalounger. It's just so ridiculous, old and kitschy, I like it.

Barcalounger is actually a trademark, like Xerox or Formica, so it gets a capital B. I wrote a paper on its history as an undergrad (got an A!).

I like palimpsest (a document or work of art that has been scraped or washed and the backing reused). It also applies to evidence of prior construction in a building. I've used it at work a couple times!

Feb 16th 2007 edited

Some more.

tumid

misogyny (A terrible thing of course. But that didn't stop me from always wanting to pronounce it miso [as in soup] Ginny.)

cache

glaucous

lipid (a scientific word that doesn't sound that way)

satiny

I love this thread. I used to play vocabulary games with my friends and we'd try to stump each other with the most obscure words we knew...yes I was (am) a dork.

Feb 16th 2007

viscous and leathery are both melodious, as is melodious.

Feb 16th 2007

Abomination...it's catharsis just to say it

Feb 16th 2007

Fustylug is a fun one.

Feb 16th 2007

Now that I used it on another thread I'm in love with it all over again:

panache

which reminds me of

vim

Feb 16th 2007

I like bannister. It can be a railing, or it can be a hard-nosed private eye with a chip on his shoulder and a soft spot for dames.

Feb 16th 2007

I kind of like balustrade, but I've never heard of anyone, real or fictional, named that.

Feb 16th 2007

Uromysitisis

Not real, and all the more awesome for it.

Feb 16th 2007

I kind of like balustrade, but I've never heard of anyone, real or fictional, named that.

The book, The Twenty-One Balloons makes good descriptive use of that word, so much so that it made me want to have a little hot air balloon house, too. I'm a little in love with vasovagal since I heard it on Scrubs last night.

Feb 16th 2007

Bergamot. The best word I ever learned from an REM song.

Feb 16th 2007 edited

omnibus and accoutrements
i think omnibus sounds full of stuff. it sounds like a vehicle capable of carrying an entire circus from town to town.

trebuchet and catapult
trebuchet does not sound like what it is, but i like the word. the guy, though, who finally said "trebuchet my arse, that's a catapult", now that guy knew how to name stuff. history is unclear though if he then asked, as some have reported, if anyone had a cat he could borrow for a moment.

Feb 16th 2007

ombudsman

Also a good idea.

And now I must say farewell, for Mrs F is once again hitting me.

Feb 21st 2007

In the name category: Melora after Jan's alter-ego. And Persifone...don't know if I botched the spelling on that one.

Feb 21st 2007

Persephone. (Our cat came with that name, and I liked it, but it was too much of a mouthful. We couldn't get it out. She now goes by Puff.)

I've always liked Waverly as a name and yes, I know about the crackers and no, I haven't ever tried to name anything that.

Feb 21st 2007

Speaking of names, that reminds me of Parsippany, as in New Jersey. It just rolls off the tongue. Coxsackie, N.Y. is another fun one. So is Saugerties, N.Y., Schodack, N.Y. and my wife and my all-time favorite from many trips down the Jersey Turnpike: Hohocus, N.J.

Feb 21st 2007

Parsippany

I could have sworn this was the word for the moss that grows on the north side of a stoner's brain.

Oregon has a few good place names, probably most famously Boring, a town just south of Portland Metro, soon to be swallowed by suburbs, no doubt. There's also Drain, which is kind of an unfortunate name. French Lick sounds disturbingly sexual, but it's just a teeny tiny town in southeast Oregon. You drive by Deep Creek on the way over the Cascades, and at least where the road passes it's only two feet deep. There's Blue Canyon, which is made up entirely of green clay. There are two John Day Rivers, on opposite ends of the state, one of which is the shortest river in North America (according to Uncle John's Bathroom Reader, anyway). There's Jumpoff Joe Creek down by Ashland. I could go on, but nobody's interested.

Anyway, another word I like a lot is tenebrae. Also, kaddish.

Feb 21st 2007 edited

French Lick sounds disturbingly sexual, but it's just a teeny tiny town in southeast Oregon.

Doesn't Indiana have a French Lick too? I think that was one of Larry Bird's nicknames..."the hick from French Lick" or something.

Playing my trump card: Missouri has a Knob Lick.

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