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4.07 Survivor Man
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151 to 180 of 244
Nov 9th 2007

No prob DftF... and thank you for that. Please forgive me as well for my dimwitted-ness

Isn't there some kind of managment course somewhere that we could take? I hear its ten weeks, but we could probably go through it in five.

Nov 9th 2007

I know I could.

Nov 9th 2007

Brian, are you really Katie Holmes?

Well, I've heard he is well-dressed, so maybe. I, too, was wondering about the "Cocktails" reference at first. But then I remembered that the Tom Cruise movie is singular, Cocktail. Not that there isn't a lot of wisdom to be gleaned from a Tom Cruise film, but still, I don't think that's what he meant in this case.

"Of course it ended badly. Everything ends badly, or else it wouldn't end."

See? A wisdom-laden Tom Cruise quote right there.

Nov 9th 2007

Sometimes it's more fun to lurk than comment. Please continue.

Nov 9th 2007

Well, his name is Brian after all. Maybe he's FX, FX2, and Cocktail star Bryan Brown and forgot how to spell his first name.

Nov 9th 2007

Cocktails

don't say tails.

Nov 9th 2007 edited

Brian, if you were indeed referencing the Cocktails episode from S3, and not the Tom Cruise-Bryan Brown classic, then how would you describe those feelings that you are now experiencing?.... Is it the ride home with Michael and Jan, and Dwight in the backseat?

Nov 9th 2007

I would like to see Ryan get his comeuppance for the intolerably douche-y way he's behaved this season but...dang strike. :)

Nov 9th 2007

In South Carolina, we don't have unions. Whenever someone on the company level wants to strike, management deals with that by firing them and hiring someone new. Any talk of unions brings swift reprisals, so just for the fact that they have a union, I agree with the writers' strike. Even if I have to miss some of my favorite shows because of it, they deserve to get paid.

Except for the writers on According to Jim. Screw those guys...;-)

Nov 9th 2007

Yeah, how about this solution: Only writers on good shows get new contracts? That way, maybe the writers on like, "Still Standing" or "Big Bang Theory" will never come back, and I won't have to hear about those shows anymore.

Nov 9th 2007

That is brilliant.

Nov 9th 2007

The thing about this writers union that bothers me is the flat rates they get paid. The mediocre scripts are worth as much. I know scripts transform from the purchasing to the release of a show, and often mediocre people interfere with good work, but I would like to imagine a world where the better writers get more money because producers are lobbying for their products. Now I sound like some free-market enthusiast. Which I am, but I'm really only trying to think about how the union hurts individuals (I don't want to get into a discussion about the realities of economics in this thread or any other). I don't think I would like to be in one, especially for writing. I don't see how hard it could be to negotiate terms each time, or with each writer. All the contracts can still be the same per studio, with differences appearing once individuals form longer-term relationships. It isn't complicated.

(And I completely discount the "we must unionize for health benefits" argument. There are too many health benefit alternatives, including associations for the self-employed that go in on group plans together.)

Nov 9th 2007

I would like to imagine a world where the better writers get more money because producers are lobbying for their products.

I'd say this is pretty close to what happens now. Better writers are always able to find jobs, sucky writers can't find jobs.

I've never worked a union-type job, but I understand their usefulness in some industries. But in some industries they can promote mediocrity, such as teachers who reach tenure and then half-ass it.

Nov 9th 2007

It's a question of what you've experienced in the work place as to how you feel about unions, I think. If you're in a service industry where the boss has the final control and say on what you do and do not get, you're more inclined to look at unions in a positive light. But the stench of corruption hangs over most established unions in more blue-collar professions, and it's hard to seperate the honest union reps from the ones who might have the job because Uncle Don Vito wants him on the job, if you catch my drift.

That being said, I doubt there are any mob ties to the Writer's Guild (though it would explain Scorsese's penchant for mob movies...)

Nov 9th 2007

Now I sound like some free-market enthusiast. Which I am, but I'm really only trying to think about how the union hurts individuals

Like the individuals who comprise the 48% of the WGA who are out of work at any given time. Seems to me there are too many writers, so their product is devalued. (Just to be completely harsh and callous about it.)

Nov 9th 2007

I thought the Jim storyline was excellent, and very realistic. No matter how well-loved someone is as a co-worker, things change when they're put in charge. Jim thought he was making a smart change on a seemingly minor issue, but as someone else pointed out, the little perks like having your birthday recognized mean a lot to people. Pam tried to gently get him to see his mistake, but ultimately, Jim needed to learn the lesson on his own. Not just about the birthday decision, but about what's involved when you're the boss. It's a challenge to deal with all the individual idiosyncracies of the staff. Jim's frustration and disbelief that it was such a big deal to everyone was so real. The scene at the end with Michael was perfect, with Jim reflecting on his day, his future, and new insight about his boss.

My favourite scene was when Pam tried to trick him into meeting in the conference room. It reminded me of their interaction in the Jinx episode.

Nov 9th 2007

Not just about the birthday decision, but about what's involved when you're the boss. It's a challenge to deal with all the individual idiosyncracies of the staff.

I think this is a really good point. Puts Michaels, "cliques and office politics" comments ina whole different light.

Nov 9th 2007

No matter how well-loved someone is as a co-worker, things change when they're put in charge.

You know this is really true. People like Jim as a co-worker, or at least tolerate him, because he's a fun guy. But when the fun guy is in charge, well, that's Michael, and he ceases to be fun.

Nov 9th 2007

No, but didn't you think Michael said Talkman? So I'm inclined to believe you heard it wrong.

No, I was in the Hawkman camp.

I thought you said "Cockman". And yes, I'll take every chance I have to say "Cockman."

Nov 9th 2007

People like Jim as a co-worker, or at least tolerate him, because he's a fun guy. But when the fun guy is in charge, well, that's Michael, and he ceases to be fun.

The others at the call center liked Michael. He was as cool there as Jim is in DM.

Nov 9th 2007

I thought you said "Cockman". And yes, I'll take every chance I have to say "Cockman."

Cockman? Did I say Cockman? "Cockman" doesn't sound like something I'd say. Cockman? Are you sure it was Cockman? Hmmm. Cockman, huh? Nope, not Cockman.

Cockman.

Nov 9th 2007

Don't say cocksman.

Nov 9th 2007

Boobs.

Nov 9th 2007

Nards.

Nov 9th 2007

The fact that someone referred to him as "Michael" is really going to haunt him and slap him in the face, again, to wake him up and make him realize that if he doesn't act on his own behalf, he will stay at Dunder Mifflin and maybe even become a regional manager.

Excellent point, Teapot.

I also think that having Karen reach the level of Regional Manager was also meant to be a wake-up call to Jim. I've been antsy to see what he really wants to do with his life. Not to bring on 15,000 posts on Say Anything again, but Jim can't only want to "be with your daughter". I really want to see the rest of this season! So many good plot lines and such great character development.

I'd like the strike to be over already and we haven't even really felt the effects yet. I'm really supportive of the WGA since what they're asking for is so small and they dropped the DVD request at the 11th hour; the studios are just being unfair.

Nov 9th 2007

he's a boob. she's a boob. i guess the "s" really does make things dirtier.

Nov 9th 2007

Not to bring on 15,000 posts on Say Anything again, but Jim can't only want to "be with your daughter".

I know what you're thinking, 69CoN, and I'm right there with you:

Jim Halpert, kickboxer.

Nov 9th 2007

It's a new sport.

Nov 9th 2007

Sport of the future, griefbone

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