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VOTE Here - because once is not enough (TWSS)
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Nov 4th 2008

On that google election thing, it says that there are 435 open seats for the House of Representatives. I thought that they alternated and like a third of them ran every 3 elections. Or something.

Are there years when the entire House or Senate is up for re-election at the same time? Or is it a google glitch?

Nov 4th 2008 edited

You vote for your representative every 2 years. The Senate is the one that only has a third of the members up for election at a time, since a Senator is elected for a 6-year term.

Nov 4th 2008

Are all the representatives elected every 2 years? So, theoretically, the entire House can completely change every 2 years?

Nov 4th 2008

Yeppers.

Nov 4th 2008

DC, what did I tell you about "yeppers"?

thanks for the answer, though.

Nov 4th 2008

Happy Election Day, everybody.

What's the best network to watch for election coverage? I'm going to be shopping around.

Nov 4th 2008

CNN. They have holograms, lots of people, and holograms. Did I mention they have holograms? And fancy digital chart things!

Nov 4th 2008

awesome. Who will be able to compete with that?

Nov 4th 2008

Are all the representatives elected every 2 years? So, theoretically, the entire House can completely change every 2 years?

Not to be a dick about it, but you seriously didn't know this?

Nov 5th 2008

I mean, I guess I learned it in 8th grade. And then again in 11th. But I only knew it till test time. Plus, it's common to keep the same representatives for several terms (at least here it is). I guess I never realized that they all run each time, though.

Nov 5th 2008 edited

I have a question. Everybody says that the determining factor in the presidential election is the electoral votes. Supposedly Bush was elected, not by the popular vote but by electoral votes. If that is true why is everyone urged to vote? I mean if it doesn't make a dang difference why do the candidates do so much campaigning and stuff? People should just have to worry about the propositions and not the presidential election since it's out of their hands. I know I must be misunderrstanding something about this because it just doesn't make sense.

Nov 5th 2008

If that is true why is everyone urged to vote?

Because your vote decides who your state will send as its electors.

Nov 5th 2008

If that is true why is everyone urged to vote? I mean if it doesn't make a dang difference why do the candidates do so much campaigning and stuff?

It keeps the masses in check by giving them the illusion of a say in the process. Silly masses.

Nov 5th 2008

If that is true why is everyone urged to vote?

Because your vote decides who your state will send as its electors.

That's what my husband told me but that doesn't really make much sense either. How can you possibly know how your states elective vote will go in the next election? We don't even know who will run in four or maybe eight years from now, or what their ideals will be. Suppose you are Republican and another Republican is the elector for your state. Is it a rule that he must vote Republican? Even so, what if in the next election you like the democrat candidate better? It doesn't seem fair. It doesn't feel democratic. You can do all of your research on the candidate of your choice but what's the good of it? Just to know what to expect?

Nov 5th 2008 edited

Here's the infallible wikipedia entry on the US Electrical College.

Basically:

Rather than directly voting for the President and Vice President, United States citizens cast votes for electors. Electors are technically free to vote for anyone eligible to be President, but in practice pledge to vote for specific candidates[2] and voters cast ballots for favored presidential and vice presidential candidates by voting for correspondingly pledged electors. . . . U.S. presidential campaigns concentrate on winning the popular vote in a combination of states that choose a majority of the electors, rather than campaigning to win the most votes nationally.

Here's the key, though, I suppose:

The Constitution allows each state legislature to designate a method of choosing electors. Forty-eight states and the District of Columbia have adopted a winner-take-all popular vote rule where voters choose between statewide slates of electors pledged to vote for a specific presidential and vice presidential candidate. The candidate that wins the most votes in the state wins the support of all of that state’s electors.

Nov 5th 2008

It doesn't seem fair. It doesn't feel democratic.

I'm pretty sure we're not supposed to talk about that.

Some states bind electors to their pledged candidate, but the Constitution doesn't. If, God forbid, Obama drops dead before they vote next month, I imagine Hillary would be sending some serious gift baskets (extra Turtles and Rolexes) their way.

Nov 5th 2008

Hillary Duff or Hillary Swank?

Nov 5th 2008

President Hillary Duff.

I smell a movie idea!

What the heck happened to Hillary Duff anyway? Is her 15 mins totally up or what?

Nov 5th 2008

Is it a rule that he must vote Republican?

In some states, yes, it is a rule. They can even be punished for going against who they pledge.

It should be noted that the state's Republican party chooses who will be their electors if the Republican candidate wins the state. It isn't like you have Democrats being forced to McCain or vice versa.

Your ballot is pretty much:

  • Electors nominated by the Republican Party pledging to vote for JOHN MCCAIN / SARAH PALIN .
  • Electors nominated by the Democratic Party pledging to vote for BARACK OBAMA / JOE BIDEN .
Nov 5th 2008

Thanks griefbone. I guess that's it, but it still doesn't make much sense to me.

Nov 5th 2008

It doesn't seem fair. It doesn't feel democratic.

I'm pretty sure we're not supposed to talk about that.

Oh, whoops.

Nov 5th 2008

It's OK. THEY probably didn't notice.

(She totally brought it up. Remember, we had a deal.)

Nov 5th 2008

I'm right here!

Nov 5th 2008

TO, I know you'd rather learn for yourself about things than be told. Here it is from the horse's mouth. Of course, this is the same guy who called the people a great beast, so take it with a grain of ye olde salt.

For me this was always the key graph...

It was equally desirable, that the immediate election should be made by men most capable of analyzing the qualities adapted to the station, and acting under circumstances favorable to deliberation, and to a judicious combination of all the reasons and inducements which were proper to govern their choice.

My overall read on it was that the intent was for the voters to truly elect these Electors, to choose the individuals voters believed most capable of selecting a president. I wonder if that was ever the case in practice, though.

Nov 5th 2008

My overall read on it was that the intent was for the voters to truly elect these Electors, to choose the individuals voters believed most capable of selecting a president. I wonder if that was ever the case in practice, though.

I doubt it. They had way more pitchforks and torches back then.

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